Little Brown – June Roundup

 

Cancel The Apocalypse: The New Path to Prosperity’ by Andrew Simms

Did She kill Him? A Victorian Tale of Deception, Adultery And Arsenic’ by Kate Colquhon

Cancel The Apocalypse: The New Path to Prosperity’ by Andrew Simms

Published by Abacus

Reviewed by Steve Earles

It’s fair to say that at this present moment in time, many people feel despair at the state of the world. Overpopulation, recession, war, global-warming, unemployment and more, all serve to make people feel hopeless.

But ‘Cancel the Apocalypse’ is the antidote to all that.

Fear of the Apocalypse has always been there, it just takes different form. During the Cold War, it was nuclear annihilation, now its global warming for instance, though it’s over-population that presents the greatest threat to the Earth.

It’s also true to say that human beings today suffer from Learned Helplessness (something Bear Grylls talked about recently was the lack of skills and reliance of people today, he’s bang on, the more we can do for ourselves, the better).

People today assume…

1. Things will get better on their own (they won’t, seriously, that’s just utter stupidity to think that way)

2. Someone or something will fix things (look at the news tonight, best to ere on the side of the assumption that someone or something won’t fix things.

This is a very healthy book, one that accepts that life constantly changes and that we need to change with it.

A superb, optimistic and important book.

Ideal for those who know that change has to start from within not from without.

Did She kill Him? A Victorian Tale of Deception, Adultery And Arsenic’ by Kate Colquhon

Published by Little, Brown

Reviewed by Steve Earles

In 1889, a woman named Florence Maybrick stood accused of murdering her much older husband, the Liverpool merchant James Maybrick.

The case was a media sensation, like the recent Oscar Pistorius murder trial.

The combination of murder and a glamorous woman proved irresistible to the Victorians and the trial was debated as much in the media as in the courtroom.

As with The Suspicions of Mr Whicher, Kate Colquhon’s writing is superb, not merely for her meticulous research but her excellent story-telling ability.

Her writing holds up a mirror to the world the Maybrick Case occurred in and it is sobering to look into it.

Life for women in particular must have been a nightmare in Victorian England, and this book makes the reader feel glad to be living in more enlightened times.

I look forward to seeing a filmed adaptation of this fine book in the future.

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